European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages by Ernst Robert Curtius

 

european literature and the latin middle ages

Published just after the Second World War, European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages is a sweeping exploration of the remarkable continuity of European literature across time and place, from the classical era up to the early nineteenth century, and from the Italian peninsula to the British Isles. In what T. S. Eliot called a "magnificent" book, Ernst Robert Curtius establishes medieval. Book Description: Published just after the Second World War,European Literature and the Latin Middle Agesis a sweeping exploration of the remarkable continuity of European literature across time and place, from the classical era up to the early nineteenth century, and from the Italian peninsula to the British winnetttbh.ml what T. S. Eliot called a "magnificent" book, Ernst Robert Curtius. European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages is a monumental work of literary scholarship. In a new introduction, Colin Burrow provides critical insights into Curtius's life and ideas and highlights the distinctive importance of this wonderful book. "This is the sort of book which takes much of a.


Project MUSE - European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages


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Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Willard R. Trask Translator. In this "magnificant book" T. EliotErnst Robert Curtiusone of the foremost literary scholars of this century, examines the continuity of European literature from Homer to Goethe, with particular emphasis on the Latin Middle Ages.

In an extensive new epilogue, drawing on hitherto unpublished material, European literature and the latin middle ages Godman, Professor of Medieval Latin at the Univ In this "magnificant book" T. In an extensive new epilogue, drawing on hitherto unpublished material, Peter Godman, Professor of Medieval Latin at the University of Tubingen, analyzes the intellectual and political context and character of Curtius's ideas.

Get A Copy. PaperbackUpdated Editionpages. Published February 21st by Princeton University Press first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters, european literature and the latin middle ages. Sort order. Aug 09, J. Nicolello rated it it was amazing. Quite early on, as in the seventh or eighth sentence of the Epistles, Seneca notes that it is best to know the masters well rather than know a little bit about every sort of text.

We see this vision more recently in the pedagogical offerings of Nabokov, Derrida, and Bloom, as well as in patterns of good men we may know or have heard of. With this man increasingly in agreement with Seneca since about age 26, i. Bolano, Ugh Boots V. Echoing Melville, as he echoed Job: "And I have only escaped to tell thee". The liberation in discarding that which is mainstream is the liberation of solitude; the contemplatives know it well. The summit of peace is solitude with adequate beverage, bread, and materials for whatever it is one loves most to do.

Anyone - which is to say most - who believes that human freedom lies in solitude's opposite, masses of brainwashed fools demanding that which will annihilate them first, are of course caricatures of themselves.

Ours is, in a word, a planet of caricatures. But in all of this, on a sleepless evening, I am getting at the fact that E. Curtius is indeed now officially part of my Heuristic Canon. We might add Augustine, Hegel, Lonergan, and Ingarden to this list too, with about 45 others that may be hidden now, but that shall in time be made manifest. For the professional scholar, the lay scholar, or even one with scholarly inclinations borne of a desire to simply become the polar opposite of what society considers 'progressive', one cannot hit the literary-critical mark much higher than Curtius here.

Yes, you should have an encyclopedic knowledge of European Literature and the intention to actually work with Curtius's many notes; for I myself have often been derailed by Curtius amidst a seemingly innocent note which, in turn, leads me on hour days frequenting innumerable bookstores and libraries around New York City. If one is at minimum respectably familiar with Goethe and, say, is willing to move backward through Latin-poetical time to, as Maritain would say, Distinguish in order to unite, then it would do one well to stop whatever one is doing and experience this testament's Heraclitean fire of the mind.

It is, in brief, the sort of book one wishes one could go back in time and read for the first time again. And yet it is so erudite, prosaic, and flowing, that one is simultaneously cognizant that there is so much here that even the most painstaking, laborious first go cannot possibly digest everything, european literature and the latin middle ages. The yearning, then, may be related to the fact that it feels as though this text was composed not some decades ago, nor centuries, but on another planet altogether.

This is holy despair: for now we must either right this wrong or support those who set out to do so Mt. View 1 comment. Oct 11, B. Hawk rated it it was amazing Shelves: historylatin. At the heart of this project, Curtius establishes three main currents: first, to demonstrate the centrality of the Middle Ages to European literature and culture; second, to establish the importance and study of medieval Latin literature; and, third, underlying the other two, to "[attack] the barbarization of education and the nationalistic frenzy In all of these, Curtius achieves his goals.

While Latin rhetoric rests At the heart of this project, Curtius establishes three main currents: first, to demonstrate the centrality of the Middle Ages to European literature and culture; second, to establish the importance and study of medieval Latin literature; and, third, underlying the other two, to "[attack] the barbarization of education and the nationalistic frenzy While Latin rhetoric rests at the heart of the study--which much of the book revolving around this controlling principle--the details span a deep understanding of medieval culture, and the individual sections provide wonderful examinations still worthy of reference.

Especially relevant for all medievalists european literature and the latin middle ages all readers in general are the first two chapters, "European Literature" and "The Latin Middle Ages. The following two chapters also european literature and the latin middle ages basic foundations, discussing "Literature and Education" and "Rhetoric. In all of these, the most important and lasting contribution to scholarship is the synthesis of topics: Curtius draws together many threads from medieval literature to weave a great single piece of art.

Importantly, european literature and the latin middle ages, Curtius's work is both very accessible and still relevant for anyone interested in medieval studies: it is still cited and discussed, and despite some datedness remains a monument for both the general and particular arguments made.

It is recommend it for students of European literature, medieval studies, and european literature and the latin middle ages interest. View all 3 comments. Oct 07, Isabel Su rated it really liked it. After read this book, believe it's rightly for me to study comparative literature. Feb 15, Michael Stapleton rated it it was amazing.

Dec 12, sasha rated it it was amazing. I assume that most people who know Curtius will have read the topoi-chapter torn out of context, in the same way that most people who know Auerbach's Mimesis will have read the chapter on Odysseus and the Old Testament, but not much further.

I'm afraid to sound snobbish, completist and elitist, but these two, along with Frank Kermode's The Sense of an Endingform a holy trinity of sorts in Western literary criticism in the twentieth century, and they cannot be understood in fragments that have I assume that most people who know Curtius will have read the topoi-chapter torn out of context, in the same way that most people who know Auerbach's Mimesis will have read the chapter on Odysseus and the Old Testament, european literature and the latin middle ages, but not much further.

I'm afraid to sound snobbish, completist and elitist, but these two, along with Frank Kermode's The Sense of an Endingform a holy trinity of sorts in Western literary criticism in the twentieth century, and they cannot be understood in fragments that have become more known than the whole in which they are embedded.

Curtius' thesis is really quite simple; what we usually refer to as the 'Dark European literature and the latin middle ages Ages' is neither dark nor particularly isolated from antiquity or classicism.

In fact, traditions and topoi, down to the single similes, survive and are transformed. Like Auerbach, he has the philologist's sense for the microscopic detail within a truly bewildering span of context, and while it may have been torture for Curtius to read the hundreds of texts that he examines, his work is a testament to how literary criticism should be done.

Nowadays, scholars bury and isolate themselves in a single phrase of Heidegger as a lens for everything, but for Curtius there is simply no excuse european literature and the latin middle ages not knowing, or at least trying to know, every single con text in a particular field. You simply can't imagine that there is anyone alive today who would be able to write this.

It is a labour, european literature and the latin middle ages, of course. To read and, I imagine, to have written. But always a labour of love. Jul 21, Will rated it it was ok. And yet the historical view of Europe makes it clear that precisely this stretch occupies a key situation as the connecting link between declining Antiquity and the Western world which was so very slowly taking shape. But it is cultivated - under the name of 'medieval Latin philology' - by a very small number of specialists.

In Europe "As we have already indicated, no stretch of European literary history is so little known and frequented as the Latin literature of the early and high Middle Ages. In Europe there might be a dozen of them. For the rest, the Middle Ages is divided between the Catholic philosophers i. Both groups have to deal with manuscript sources and texts - hence with literature. The medieval Latinists, the historians of Scholasticism, and the political historians, however, have little contact with one another.

The same is true of the modern philologists. These also work on the Middle Ages, but they usually remain aloof from Medieval Latin philology as they do from general literary, political, and cultural history, european literature and the latin middle ages.

Thus the Middle Ages is dismembered into specialties which have no contact. There is no general discipline of the Middle Ages - a further impediment to the study of European literature. Troeltsch could rightly say in 'The culture of the Middle Ages still awaits presentation' Der Historisumus, That is still true today.

The culture of the Middle Ages cannot yet be presented, because its Latin literature has as yet been incompletely studied. In this sense the Middle Ages is still as dark today as it - wrongly - appeared to the Italian Humanists. For that reason a historical consideration of European literature must begin at its darkest point.

The present study is therefore entitled European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages, and we hope that this title will justify its purport with increasing evidence from chapter to chapter.

May 19, Matthew Dambro rated it it was amazing.

 

 

european literature and the latin middle ages

 

Published just after the Second World War, European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages is a sweeping exploration of the remarkable continuity of European literature across time and place, from the classical era up to the early nineteenth century, and from the Italian peninsula to the British Isles. In what T. S. Eliot called a "magnificent" book, Ernst Robert Curtius establishes medieval. Ernst Robert Curtius (/ ˈ k ʊər t s i ʊ s /; April 14, – April 19, ) was a German literary scholar, philologist, and Romance language literary critic, best known for his study Europäische Literatur und Lateinisches Mittelalter, translated in English as European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages. European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages is a monumental work of literary scholarship. In a new introduction, Colin Burrow provides critical insights into Curtius's life and ideas and highlights the distinctive importance of this wonderful book. Inspire a love of reading with Prime Book Box for Kids Cited by: